Monthly Archives: October 2009

New Coalition Urges White House to Think Big, Boldly on Global Health

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 A diverse coalition of more than two dozen organizations outlined a bold, comprehensive approach to global health at a Capitol Hill briefing today. The briefing comes as White House officials work behind closed doors to flesh out the details of a much-anticipated new US strategy on fighting disease and improving health across the globe. Today’s […]

Living Proof Project Launched in Washington

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Last night Bill and Melinda Gates launched their Living Proof Project, which eloquently shows how US investments in global health are something of which every American should be proud.   The main event was at a packed auditorium in downtown Washington, where the Gates’ took turns speaking about global health and their personal commitment to these […]

Getting Out of the Vertical Vs. Horizontal Box

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The November issue of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes offers something of a roadmap for how best to move forward, more productively and less bitterly, in the decades-old debate that pits diseases-specific health initiatives against broader efforts to strengthen health systems. With nearly 20 articles exploring the relationship between HIV scale up and global […]

Those with HIV May Have Higher Risk for Complications Related to H1N1

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As the government rolls out its response to H1N1, this news about the interaction between so-called “swine flu” and HIV should be of interest: “The prevalence of certain underlying conditions, including immunosuppressing conditions, has been higher than in the general population suggesting HIV-infected adults and adolescents also might be at higher risk for complications related […]

PEPFAR Has "Mandate Without Money," Haitians Have ARVs without Water, Food, Shelter

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A delegation of HIV-positive Haitains recently visited Washington to lobby for robust funding for PEPFAR. Read their compelling stories in this blog, which details how HIV-positive patients have access to HIV drugs but not necessarilly to a glass of water to wash the pills down or food to make the medicines tolerable and effective.

Needle Exchange Programs Curb the Spread of HIV/AIDS Across the Globe

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In case lawmakers need an extra nudge as they consider lifting the ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs, here are two fresh facts on the effectiveness of this tool in reducing the spread of HIV: *In India, needle exchange programs have contributed to a dramatic reduction in HIV seroprevalence among injection drug users—cutting […]

In AIDS Vaccine Search, Decades of Disappointment Mean Even Small Gains are Significant

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With the 2009 AIDS Vaccine Conference underway in Paris, folks are finally getting a peak at the all-important details of the widely-publicized Thai vaccine trial and its much analyzed, but little understood, results. Since the study results were first announced amid much hoopla three weeks ago, there have been more questions than answers about the […]

HIV/AIDS Physician-Scientists, Advocates Call for Bold HIV Treatment Goals for PEPFAR

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Physician-scientists working on the frontlines of the HIV/AIDS epidemic today urged the White House to set bold new HIV treatment targets for PEPFAR, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. The Center for Global Health Policy joined with a coalition of other organizations—including HealthGAP, amfAR (the Foundation for AIDS Research), the Treatment Action Group, […]

Another Piece of Evidence in the Case for Earlier, Wider Access to ART

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The case for earlier and wider initiation of antiretroviral therapy just keeps getting stronger. First, there’s the increasing solid consensus that initiating ART earlier significantly increases an HIV patient’s chances of survival. Then there’s the fact that initiating ART earlier reduces the number of people needing more costly second-line therapy. We also know that the […]

An End to the Vertical Vs. Horizontal Debate?

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For decades, global health experts, policymakers, and others have been debating the merits of disease-specific initiatives versus broader efforts to strengthen health systems. It’s the old the vertical vs. horizontal argument. No one has settled that debate. But maybe we should stop asking that particular question. Or at least start asking some new ones.  “It’s not a […]