Monthly Archives: December 2012

Secretary of State nominee Kerry brings record of global health involvement

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As senator, John Kerry  championed AIDS Vaccine development and proposed the abolition of the HIV travel ban, spoke up for the rights of people with disabilities globally and articulated the impact of homophobic laws. Leading the charge to restore $4 billion in funding to the International Affairs budget he cited, among other issues, the consequences […]

A doctor’s path, directed by devastation, supported by science, takes him back to Africa

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Dr. Charles Holmes was completing his medical education when he lived and worked for three months in Malawi in 1999. The AIDS epidemic there, uncontrolled, was peaking. Medicine had been saving AIDS patients’ lives in wealthy countries for the last five years, but was still out of reach for most Africans. Desperately sick people lay […]

AIDS is not over, turning a dream into reality, how to reduce sex work risks and more . . .

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AIDS is not over: All right, so maybe nobody said it was, but all the same the massive, “super-human” effort of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study in The Lancet December issue is a timely reminder that in the era of evolving and effective treatment, and talk of an AIDS-free generation, the disease continues […]

Breaking News: Amb. Goosby to head new Global Health Diplomacy office, will continue to lead PEPFAR

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Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric Goosby will head the new Office of Global Health Diplomacy at the State Department, while retaining, at least for the immediate future, control over the President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief, the program he has headed for the last three years. The Global Health Diplomacy office was announced last July […]

New Senate Democrats get Foreign Relations Committee spots

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Science Speaks is continuing to look at changes in Washington’s global health leadership in the wake of November’s election. While Sen. Dick Durbin, who played a pivotal role in PEPFAR’s creation, leaves the Senate Foreign Relations Committee,  two new Democratic members, as announced Wednesday, will join the committee which directs foreign aid. Chris Murphy  (D-Ct) […]

NIH-funded TB drug trial is latest effort to fill treatment pipeline

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A 14-day trial enrolling 75 Cape Town South Africa patients, to see if a new investigational drug lowers tuberculosis bacteria counts represents the latest hope for filling the need for treatment options for the disease, the National Institutes of Health announced this week. The NIH is sponsoring the trial led by Case Western Reserve researchers […]

Exiting foreign affairs leaders take decades of experience as they leave Capitol

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As the 112th Congress draws to a close, Science Speaks is following changes in global health leadership, today looking at outgoing global issues leaders Rep. Howard Berman, former chair, and ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and Sen. Richard Lugar, ranking member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.   Rep. Howard Berman […]

Ugandan anti-homosexuality bill makes this International Human Rights Day a time to look at health impacts of homophobic landscapes

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The Ugandan Parliament speaker’s promise to present his country with the “Christmas present” of a revived anti-homosexuality bill has led, in turn to a revived interest in the human rights landscape of that country, three years after the bill with its death penalty provision for “aggravated homosexuality” was first announced. The most recent attention, with […]

Remembering Winstone Zulu, disability rights dealt a blow, World AIDS Day writings, and more

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Remembering Zambian Activist Winstone Zulu: This post from ACTION of the speech given at the unveiling of Winstone Zulu’s tombstone last week, is a timely reminder of the work the Zambian AIDS activist devoted more than half of his life to. Diagnosed with HIV in his twenties, Zulu is credited with being the first in […]

Groups seek recognition of global health response “secret weapon”

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When people talk about the how life-saving medicine finally made it to poor countries, how tuberculosis patients far from clinics finished grueling treatment courses, and how 50 million or so newborns made it past infancy over the last 20 years because their mothers, and they, got the treatment they needed, the talk is often of […]