Monthly Archives: December 2016

With new leaders, the global health landscape faces shifts . . . we’re reading about changes

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Antonio Guterres, Known for Nerve and Deal Making, Will Need Both at U.N. – Former Portugal Prime Minister António Guterres was sworn in this week as the ninth Secretary General of the United Nations, bringing a record relevant to global health. Portugal’s decriminalization of drug use in response to the country’s heroin addiction epidemic on […]

Global Health Security Agenda measures early advances toward readiness to contain outbreaks

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“None of this works if you’ve got a hole in the net . . .” Last year, an international partnership that includes the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Defense, the Department of Agriculture, as well as donors and agencies from Canada and European countries, and health officials in countries around […]

Columbia study finds Zika-related microcephaly risk appears greatest in early pregnancy

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In early August 2015, Columbia’s national health service began to collect what would add up over the year that followed to about 105,000 reports of suspected Zika virus infections, with close to 20,000 of those among pregnant women. Six months later, health officials began to collect reports of a steeply climbing number of babies born […]

Congress extends Continuing Resolution adding some funding to NIH, FDA through Cures Act

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Avoiding a government shutdown with just an hour to spare, the U.S. Senate late Friday night passed a continuing resolution to fund the government until April 28, 2017. The House had passed the bill, which maintains most federal programs at current funding levels, on Thursday. Many congressional Democrats argued to extend federal funding for the full […]

We’re reading about monitoring infectious diseases around the world, and how irresponsible public health practices can mean having to say you’re sorry

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Four steps to precision public health – What if when the first Zika cases in Miami broke out, the entire nation had been declared in a state of emergency? That probably wouldn’t have made for a very efficient response. But in resource-limited countries where speed and focus in responding to infectious disease outbreaks are all […]

In point of care testing, quality counts

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In places where rates of diseases that include malaria, HIV and tuberculosis are highest, the obstacles to tackling them begin with diagnosis. While the people most affected are likeliest to live on the edges of a city or in more remote rural areas, a recent edition of African Journal of Laboratory Medicine notes, most diagnostic […]

Examination of West Africa Ebola crisis highlights fault lines revealed in previous outbreaks, opportunities to expand knowledge

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The threat of Ebola across Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone in 2014 had been recognized about three months earlier when an unrelated outbreak began in an isolated village in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that July, with markedly different impacts and outcomes. Contained by that November, the outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo […]

HIV viral load testing capacities progress, require global support, multiple partners to reach 90-90-90 goals

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Four of seven sub-Saharan African countries followed by researchers over the last year and a half now can track the effectiveness of HIV treatment among all patients receiving it with tests to measure the levels of virus in their bodies at least once a year, according to an update in last week’s Centers for Disease […]

World AIDS Day: We’re reading about history, progress, gaps, and the costs of inequities

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The AIDS.gov Timeline of HIV/AIDS, first posted in 2011 and updated since, is  a good place to go for a look at the winding path of recognition and response to HIV. From the announcement of the “Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals” to the formation of the first community based response of the Gay Men’s […]