Monthly Archives: November 2017

For people with HIV, viral suppression is critical to protection from yellow fever vaccine

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A study on the effectiveness of the yellow fever vaccine among people living with HIV yields yet another reason that universal access to effective consistent antiretroviral medicine for people with the virus is important to global public health. The study, published in the recent Clinical Infectious Diseases found that the yellow fever vaccine offers long-term […]

Exploration of geography with technology can open the health landscape and put services within reach

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The following is a guest post by John Spencer of MEASURE Evaluation As a geographer, I believe it’s necessary to understand where things happen if you want to change the world. Are health facilities near the people who need them? Do diseases cluster in a specific place? Where should we direct resources after crises such […]

What we’re reading: The Global Fund picked a new executive director

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Having narrowed its second round of finalists to four, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria today announced its selection of former Standard Bank chief executive, World Bank pandemic preparedness working group chair, and Harvard research fellow Peter Sands as the international charity’s fourth executive director. We’re reading about the process and the […]

Stigma surrounding tuberculosis keeps patients from services, worsens health risks, but remains largely unmeasured, unaddressed

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Interviews in Kenya, Tanzania and Namibia health facilities found that the more staff knew about patients’ rights, the likelier they were to recognize — and report — discrimination against people with tuberculosis. A study in Lesotho found links between stigma surrounding HIV and TB and increased rates of depression and alcohol use among co-infected patients. […]

Analysis: Commitment to global health research, training, investment is critical to U.S. interests

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The world was less connected then than it is now when the 1918 pandemic of HIN1 influenza broke out. Even then, by the time the outbreak ended two years later, it killed at least 50 million people around the world, from eastern Europe to the South Pacific, to the Arctic, taking 675,000 lives in the […]

TB R&D spending climbs — but not enough

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In time for meetings of international leaders, 2016 boost in TB investments sets new — but low — bar, as well as impetus to gain on momentum, advocates say Investment in research and development toward new tuberculosis drugs, diagnostic tests and preventive measures increased in 2016 for first time in seven years, exceeding the previous […]

We’re reading the solutions to mysteries: What Chopin’s heart revealed, why dengue comes back with a vengeance, and how to end AIDS

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Chopin’s heart, pickled in a jar, offers clues to his death – It took more than a century and a half, a gathering of scientists, church officials and Chopin institute leaders, as well as  knowledge gained through modern medicine to determine, finally, that when the brilliant young composer Frédéric Chopin died in 1849, it was […]

48th Union World Conference: Minimally invasive autopsies could fill in the blanks on causes of death

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GUADALAJARA, Mexico – In places where a person can get sick with tuberculosis but never get diagnosed, or get diagnosed, but never treated, with their illness never reported, and where a person can die young without ever coming in contact with a health system, the uncertainties surrounding the true impacts of the TB continue all the […]

48th Union World Conference: In the long path to TB care, competence is among the obstacles

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GUADALAJARA, Mexico – One after another, patients came to clinics and hospitals in rural China complaining of alarming, nagging and debilitating symptoms. They noted  coughs and fevers that didn’t go away, and that they were losing weight for no apparent reason. Their symptoms should have sounded familiar in the health centers of a country with […]

48th Union World Conference: Review finds missed opportunities for preventive therapy for children with HIV in Swaziland

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GUADALAJARA, Mexico – While the vulnerability of children with HIV to tuberculosis has prompted World Health Organization guidelines recommending TB preventive therapy for children with the virus who are over a year old, a review of patient data across 10 years at a Swaziland center providing care to about a fifth of all children with […]