Monthly Archives: November 2017

Medical circumcision efforts gained ground against new HIV infections, but not enough

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Focused efforts to protect men and boys from HIV led to more than 14.5 million medical circumcision procedures globally between 2008 and 2016, enough to avert an estimated half million infections by 2030, according to a report released today. That progress, however, falls at least 30 percent short of the nearly 21 million procedures originally […]

Report shows 1 in 10 medicines in low-and middle income countries are substandard, falsified

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Antibiotics and antimalarial drugs are most frequently reported as substandard and falsified to the World Health Organization’s Global Surveillance and Monitoring system for such medical products, according to a WHO report released this week. The report estimates that one in ten medical products in low- and middle-income countries either fail to meet quality standards or […]

What we’re reading: The impacts of science and stigma

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Grateful for progress toward a disease-free world – In a world made smaller by travel, trade, and emerging infections, we’re grateful for physicians and researchers who work together across national borders to build a healthier world. Fogarty International Center Director Roger Glass discusses the progress those partnerships have yielded. Three decades on, stigma still stymies […]

Study reveals biological processes leading to active tuberculosis disease

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Researchers at the University of Cape Town in South Africa have identified a sequence of biological processes that occur as tuberculosis infection progresses to active pulmonary tuberculosis disease. The findings, which demonstrate a clear timeline of biological events that occur between infection and disease, hold important implications for the development of new diagnostics, treatments, and […]

For people with HIV, viral suppression is critical to protection from yellow fever vaccine

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A study on the effectiveness of the yellow fever vaccine among people living with HIV yields yet another reason that universal access to effective consistent antiretroviral medicine for people with the virus is important to global public health. The study, published in the recent Clinical Infectious Diseases found that the yellow fever vaccine offers long-term […]

Exploration of geography with technology can open the health landscape and put services within reach

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The following is a guest post by John Spencer of MEASURE Evaluation As a geographer, I believe it’s necessary to understand where things happen if you want to change the world. Are health facilities near the people who need them? Do diseases cluster in a specific place? Where should we direct resources after crises such […]

What we’re reading: The Global Fund picked a new executive director

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Having narrowed its second round of finalists to four, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria today announced its selection of former Standard Bank chief executive, World Bank pandemic preparedness working group chair, and Harvard research fellow Peter Sands as the international charity’s fourth executive director. We’re reading about the process and the […]

Stigma surrounding tuberculosis keeps patients from services, worsens health risks, but remains largely unmeasured, unaddressed

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Interviews in Kenya, Tanzania and Namibia health facilities found that the more staff knew about patients’ rights, the likelier they were to recognize — and report — discrimination against people with tuberculosis. A study in Lesotho found links between stigma surrounding HIV and TB and increased rates of depression and alcohol use among co-infected patients. […]

Analysis: Commitment to global health research, training, investment is critical to U.S. interests

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The world was less connected then than it is now when the 1918 pandemic of HIN1 influenza broke out. Even then, by the time the outbreak ended two years later, it killed at least 50 million people around the world, from eastern Europe to the South Pacific, to the Arctic, taking 675,000 lives in the […]

TB R&D spending climbs — but not enough

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In time for meetings of international leaders, 2016 boost in TB investments sets new — but low — bar, as well as impetus to gain on momentum, advocates say Investment in research and development toward new tuberculosis drugs, diagnostic tests and preventive measures increased in 2016 for first time in seven years, exceeding the previous […]