Monthly Archives: March 2018

What we’re reading: A State Department switch, a trip to Africa, and DREAMS deferred?

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Trump ousts Tillerson, will replace him as secretary of state with CIA chief Pompeo – Secretary Rex Tillerson cut short his trip to Africa, this article notes, where he had cancelled an appearance at an event in Kenya highlighting achievements of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief there after learning of his dismissal. We […]

Getting gender into your science means more than “add women and stir”

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The following is a guest post by Jessica Fehringer, PhD, MEASURE Evaluation I’ve worked in research and with researchers for a while, and often I hear people say that it doesn’t make sense to address gender in their research. When we think about science, we think about proving or disproving a hypothesis. In other words, […]

CROI 2018: Women controlled HIV-protection gains ground with interim results from open-label trials of antiretroviral vaginal ring

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BOSTON – With high rates of uptake, high rates of use, and HIV infection rates less than half of what would otherwise have been anticipated, the continued development of vaginal rings loaded with antiretroviral drug as a means of protection from the virus gained a large measure of vindication in interim trial results released here […]

CROI 2018: HIV field can lead steps to integrate care, recognize human right to mental health

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BOSTON – In 25 years of a conference providing a forum for research on HIV and the conditions that can accompany life with the virus, this morning’s plenary talk was, apparently, the first to examine the interaction between mental health and risks of infection, treatment challenges and death. Still, Dr. Robert Remien of New York […]

CROI 2018: Dr. Harold Jaffe looks back — for lessons to inform responses to the next infectious disease outbreak

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BOSTON – Considering the strides in HIV science to be presented here this week, Dr. Harold Jaffe didn’t at first see the point of dwelling on the history of the epidemic, the topic he was asked to address here this morning. Then, he said, he thought about all the lessons those years had yielded, and […]

CROI 2018: HIV drug-resistance testing leads to “tremendous opportunity” to target, treatment, prevention, partner services

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BOSTON – Using existing analyses of viruses generated by drug-resistance testing among people diagnosed with HIV, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study identified 60 clusters of people across the United States among whom the virus was spreading at 11 times the rate  — at 44 transmissions per 100 person years — than […]

CROI 2018: 25 years of HIV science see “precision prevention,” hopes for long-term remission, attention to TB, and more

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BOSTON – Dr. Judith Currier, now chair of the 25th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, didn’t attend the first CROI in 1993, but she remembers how things were then. A dozen years into the epidemic, AIDS was the leading cause of people in their most productive years. Care for people living with HIV meant […]

Zero Discrimination also means quality care

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The following is a guest post by Katherine Andrinopoulos, PhD, MEASURE Evaluation, Tulane University This week, the United Nations observed Zero Discrimination Day, meant to promote equality before the law and in practice—including healthcare—throughout all member countries of the UN. In public health, we know that zero discrimination is essentially about fairness. It is fundamental […]

What we’re reading: An unimaginably bad budget plan, and its impacts . . .

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The Trump Budget’s Effect on HIV: Unimaginably Bad – Dr. Melanie Thompson is Chair of the HIV Medicine Association and principal investigator of AIDS research at the Consortium of Atlanta. As a physician specializing in HIV care she has seen the inequities that fuel the epidemic in Atlanta, Georgia, and the impacts. Here, she enumerates […]