Author Archives: Antigone Barton

Secret trade negotiations have life-threatening side effects . . . We’re reading about the Trans-Pacific Partnership

By on .

Help us fix the TPP – Médecins Sans Frontières depends on access to affordable drugs to balance the odds against people in places where life-saving treatment is scarce. The international humanitarian organization, which has a record of recognizing and responding to health threats others have ignored, explains in a video here how the lengthy and […]

One more need in Ebola-stricken countries: Strategies to deal with survivors’ long-term health needs

By on .

Study looks at persistent impact of Ebola virus infection More than two years after surviving an Ebola virus that killed 39 people in Uganda, adults reported chronic debilitating health issues that included vision problems, hearing loss, headaches, joint pain, memory deficits, confusion, and trouble carrying out routine work activities, a study published today in The […]

Young women and HIV: What makes this time different? Panel reflects on failures, “DREAMS”

By on .

If you are listening to speakers representing U.S. leadership of global AIDS responses, usually you are likely to hear about the great success of efforts to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV, as evidenced by more than a million babies born uninfected with the virus, thanks to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. […]

In Zambia, an infectious disease response aims for excellence: “This is what a local organization looks like”

By on .

When Dr. Charles Holmes left the office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator  for Zambia at the end of 2012, he had a plan that was both modest and ambitious. He was going to use what he had learned as chief medical officer for the world’s largest program dedicated to a single disease, and build […]

From an Ebola response to a PrEP trial, we’re reading why infectious disease responses and health system strengthening go together

By on .

Women in PrEP trial feared they would have to leave study if they reported low adherence – This is a story we’ve heard before — several times now: Women are enrolled in a study to determine the effectiveness of a biomedical method to protect themselves from HIV infection. Earlier studies have indicated the method holds […]

Report from Tanzania: Attention to realities on the ground, criminalized populations, civil society needed to sustain HIV, TB responses

By on .

Redeployment: Opportunities to Control HIV and TB in Tanzania, Observations from Dar es Salaam, Mbeya, and Zanzibar looks at successes, challenges, gaps in public health responses, and at how to deliver “the right things to the right places at the right time.” When we set off for Tanzania last fall, we stayed in touch with […]

Self-testing for HIV in low-income, high-incidence countries could save money, could improve outcomes . . . but it’s complicated, analysis finds

By on .

Introducing self-testing in a country like Zimbabwe, where HIV incidence is high, resources to confront HIV are limited, and only about half the people who live with HIV know they have the virus, could save about $75 million over the next 20 years, with some health benefits, besides. That would make the self-testing more cost-effective […]

Ebola lessons reiterate need to recognize global health realities

By on .

An article in a recent issue of the American Society for Laboratory Medicine Lab Culture Newsletter begins by placing the reader in a health facility “holding center” where residents of a city experiencing an Ebola outbreak, in Sierra Leone, in Guinea, or in Liberia, would be referred upon the onset of symptoms. In harrowing terms […]

Sen. Cardin brings record of global health involvement as he takes lead Democrat seat on Senate Foreign Relations Committee

By on .

The Senator replacing Bob Menendez as ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee takes on the role with a record spanning nearly three decades in Congress of stances supporting policies to improve health, human rights and science-based global and domestic responses. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD) has served on the committee since coming to the […]

Lessons from Ebola: A vaccine fast track too slow demonstrates need to prepare for pandemic potential diseases

By on .

The following is a guest post by Elizabeth Bukowski, who covered the 3rd International One Health Congress in Amsterdam for Science Speaks. The conference, from March 18-21, focused on how science can help prevent emerging infectious diseases, 75 percent of which are estimated to originate in animals. The One Health concept recognizes that human, animal […]