Author Archives: Antigone Barton

Zika-related birth defects climb in U.S. regions with local transmission of the virus

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The second half of 2016 saw a significant climb in birth defects associated with Zika infections during pregnancy in areas of the United States and its territories where the virus had been transmitted locally, according to a report the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released today. While most of the mothers and infants […]

Infectious diseases doctor sounds an international alarm about HIV treatment resistance in the Philippines

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Visiting IDWeek in October, we met with Dr. Edsel Salvana, an infectious diseases physician from the Philippines who has learned to tell the complicated story of the impacts and implications of the HIV epidemic in his country quickly and clearly. Now, with the online release  of his August 2017 TED Talk, you can see for […]

What we’re reading: How critical efforts to build infectious disease capacities worldwide could be diminished, and why that matters

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CDC to cut back disease work in foreign countries – Even as U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Global Affairs Director Garret Grigsby expounded on the need for increased investments in worldwide public health emergency preparedness, the Wall Street Journal was detailing plans at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  “to scale […]

Shutdown? Or situation? . . . due to the whadyacallit, “the information on this site may not be current . . .”

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In the wake of reports that the Department of Health and Human Services issued recent “style guidelines” advising agency staffers crafting budget proposals to avoid certain words, it was a comfort to note that at least when funding fails altogether, the wording is wide open . . . The “situation” For the Department itself, the […]

Study finds deaths among Zambia HIV patients on treatment underestimated, and up to 20 times higher than among patients in Europe

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A study examining data from records at facilities serving more than 160,000 patients on treatment for HIV across Zambia, along with data tracking patients who stopped coming for care at the facilities found that 7 percent of all patients treatment died within two years, a figure from three-to-nine times higher than previous estimates. Those findings […]

What we’re reading . . . A wish list, lessons from the last century, and the inequity of agony

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MSF’s 2018 Wish List – From stopping the preventable toll of the world’s leading infectious disease killer by accelerating access to the treatments that cure tuberculosis, to protecting generic drugs, to putting vaccines within reach of children who now die from pneumonia at a rate of one every 35 seconds, this wish list from Médecins […]

Survey across seven African countries finds young women and teenage girls less than halfway to 2020 goals for HIV control

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Fewer than half of the adolescent girls and young women living with HIV who were tested for the virus as part of door-to-door surveys across communities in seven African countries were already aware of their infection, according to findings released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s far short of the 2020 […]

In Guatemala study, illnesses indicating AIDS were already present in about fourth of patients newly diagnosed with HIV

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At Guatemala’s largest HIV clinic, researchers took a retrospective study of current patient records. One in four patients, they found, had an illness indicating advanced progression of the virus at the time they were diagnosed, increasing their risks of other diseases and death, while increasing the costs of their care. With plans now turning to […]

Ebola study in Sierra Leone community finds a third of households with an infected member saw transmissions to others

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With transmissions between family members accounting for most infections during the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola outbreak, the virus spread to other members in one out of three households that was home to an infected person, a study in one Sierra Leone community found. In half of those households experiencing transmissions, the initial case led to […]

Keeping the balance in how we prevent HIV: Evaluating structural interventions

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The following is a guest post by Jim Thomas, PhD In 1978, the world celebrated the end of smallpox. Through a coordinated multinational effort, a global vaccination program had reached the furthest corners of the earth and eliminated the ability of the virus to spread. The success was intoxicating. Lists of the next diseases to […]