UNAIDS global HIV data shows “miles to go”

By on .

The tale of two global HIV responses continues to unfold this week, in data released by UNAIDS in the run-up to the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam. One response, driven by antiretroviral treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis, by unhindered access to health services and education, by the decriminalization of drug use and sex work, along […]

An affirmation on the way to AIDS 2018: Much has changed, not enough, and some for the worse

By on .

In calls for improved inclusiveness, evidence-based expenditures, and people-based policies, screeds released in advance of International AIDS Conferences tend to echo those of the year before, holding, if not advancing, established intentions. This year’s, an “affirmation,” rather than a “declaration” seems to acknowledge that in its title, but it also notes significant changes — in […]

What do you read, to track 25 years of HIV stigma and progress? Words, words, words . . .

By on .

From the first International AIDS Conference in Atlanta with about a thousand attendees in 1985, to the upcoming one in Amsterdam where about 18,000 are expected later this month, the annual, and then biennial meetings served as milestones in a slow climb of scientific, political and community progress against the pandemic. Memorable peaks include the […]

In Lesotho, where life expectancy is under 50, the last to test for HIV are the hardest to reach

By on .

Clinics for men, adolescent-dedicated sections in existing clinics, and increased support for community-based services are all needed to expand the reach of HIV testing in Lesotho, and offer hope of controlling the epidemic in a country where the virus is responsible for one of the shortest life expectancies in the world, according to a report […]

What we’re reading: Testing lag highlights role of healthcare access in HIV prevention and more about knowing the right thing to do, but . . .

By on .

Tests are lagging and the end of the epidemic is far away – How can it be that nearly four decades after what later became known as HIV was first recognized as a syndrome killing men who had sex with men, and more than a decade since U.S. public health officials recommended routine testing as […]

Study surprises with findings that use of efavirenz appeared to lessen depression risk among patients in Uganda

By on .

For years the association of a life-saving medicine commonly used in first-line antiretroviral treatment regimens with psychiatric side effects that included thoughts of suicide, posed an urgent question to HIV physicians administering care across Africa. Risks of depression among people living with HIV already are higher than among those of the general population and threaten […]

Peers speed HIV diagnosis to treatment start in country with world’s highest estimated prevalence

By on .

In the Kingdom of eSwatini, the nation formerly known as Swaziland, where the percentage of the population who live with HIV is estimated to be the highest in the world, efforts to provide testing for the virus have been widespread and successful. It’s the next step, from testing to treatment for those who test positive, […]

Analysis highlights hurdles between pregnant women with HIV and treatment

By on .

Interactions among poverty, gender, and health systems affect women’s participation in services to prevent HIV transmission from mother to child: a causal loop analysis The following is a guest post by Jennifer Yourkavitch, MPH, PhD, of MEASURE Evaluation Retaining women in programs to prevent transmission of HIV from mother to child remains a priority and […]