Category Archives: HIV/AIDS

Study asks: What if a “concentrated” HIV epidemic is bigger than 1 percent?

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In a “generalized HIV epidemic,” what if all transmission during sex work stopped? Call it a different kind of 1 percent — the kind that doesn’t connote privilege. In the definition that sets the course of HIV programming, an epidemic is considered “concentrated” among specific populations, (i.e. sex workers, people who inject drugs, and men […]

Budget cuts threaten HIV vaccine development, say experts

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New HIV infections would decrease by 40 percent within ten years after the launch of an HIV vaccine, experts said at an HIV Vaccine Awareness Day event on Monday hosted by AVAC, IAVI and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Advancements in technology have paved the way for an effective HIV vaccine, but progress is threatened […]

Court clears HIV treatment and human rights advocate Paul Kasonkomona in case highlighting free speech, recognition of men who have sex with men

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A Zambian High Court today affirmed the acquittal of human rights activist Paul Kasonkomona today in a case that highlighted obstacles to HIV prevention and treatment services in a country where sex between men remains a crime. Kasonkomona was arrested in 2013 shortly after speaking on a local talk show about the need for Zambia […]

For HIV counselors in Zambia, work hits close to home

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The following is a guest post from Karen Blyth, director of East Africa programs for Intrahealth International. They’ve lost children, family, and friends to HIV. Now they search their community’s churches, bars, schools, and markets, offering help to those who are at risk but often out of reach. By Karen Blyth In a small office […]

Neighborhood wealth inequality in sub-Saharan Africa predictive of greater HIV risk

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The following is a guest post from MEASURE Evaluation and Department of Public Policy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill By Paul Brodish An Association between Neighbourhood Wealth Inequality and HIV Prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa, published recently in the Journal of Biosocial Science, investigates whether community-level wealth inequality in the region predicts HIV serostatus. […]

Young women and HIV: What makes this time different? Panel reflects on failures, “DREAMS”

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If you are listening to speakers representing U.S. leadership of global AIDS responses, usually you are likely to hear about the great success of efforts to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV, as evidenced by more than a million babies born uninfected with the virus, thanks to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. […]

Self-testing for HIV in low-income, high-incidence countries could save money, could improve outcomes . . . but it’s complicated, analysis finds

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Introducing self-testing in a country like Zimbabwe, where HIV incidence is high, resources to confront HIV are limited, and only about half the people who live with HIV know they have the virus, could save about $75 million over the next 20 years, with some health benefits, besides. That would make the self-testing more cost-effective […]

HIV testing support in Tanzania puts emphasis on impact

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The following is a guest post from Mkama Mwirjarubi, a program officer at IntraHealth International in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. by Mkama Mwijarubi As the fight against HIV rolls into its fourth decade, those of us who are involved in combating the epidemic have mixed feelings. While HIV continues to affect the lives of many […]

Zambia Gender Minister: Poverty slows march toward equity

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The Honorable Professor Nkandu Luo, now Zambia’s Minister of Gender and Child Development, is a physician, professor of microbiology and immunology, a former Parliament member, former Minister of Health and founder of a an organization supporting sex workers*. Having overcome some of the challenges facing women and girls in her country, and worked to address […]