Category Archives: What we’re reading

We’re reading about rights and responsibilities and empathy in fighting HIV, tuberculosis

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Fighting HIV/AIDS: Human rights focused advocacy is more critical than ever – “Low hanging fruit” is one of the expressions that is used to describe people and places affected by HIV who account for the great majority of those now reached with testing, antiretroviral treatment and other prevention of HIV acquisition and transmission. With dollars […]

We’re reading about gaps between funding and reality . . . and more

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Research and public health funding must reflect reality – Dr. Wlliam Powderly, president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, which produces this blog, founding chair of the HIV Medicine Association, and director of the Institute for Public Health at Washington University, has followed advances in HIV care and the translation of clinical advances to […]

We’re reading how arguments for cuts to health and science spending don’t add up

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Trump’s unethical aid cuts – Yes, in real dollars the United States spends more on foreign aid than other countries, but in relation to U.S. gross national income, it falls far short of paying its fair share. This piece by Princeton bioethics professor Peter Singer debunks the Trump administration’s justification for the foreign aid spending cuts […]

We’re reading lessons of PEPFAR, and from progress gained and abandoned

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PEPFAR: Oh what good you have done!  From South Africa’s first reported AIDS patient in 1982, to the years when the epidemic filled hospitals and graveyards, to the miraculous but selective deliverance of antiretroviral medicine, to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, to a White House budget proposal for 2018 that threatens to reverse […]

We’re reading about the values and value behind health services, security, and science

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Trump’s proposed NIH cuts would extend far beyond U.S. – “We are all together.” That is the value that brought the author of this piece in the Kansas City Star from his home in Missouri to Mauritania to Senegal. Now a physician, he has observed that high rates of cervical cancer, a preventable disease, fall […]

With a budget on the table that leaves science and lives around the world vulnerable, we’re reading about impacts and a better way

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Fund global health: Save lives and money – Comparing the costs of emergency responses to Zika and Ebola to the relatively miniscule, roughly $70 million budget of the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center, this letter from physician researchers — at Yale University, in Liberia, in Florida, and in Maryland argues against the Trump […]

We’re reading about climate change policy, global disease funding and international research — and how decisions in Washington hit home, around the world

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Infectious disease collides with changing climate – After two dry years, the rains that flooded the forests and plantations of Brazil’s countrysides unleashed a bumper crop of mosquitos, speeding the spread of the country’s deadliest outbreak of yellow fever on record. Impacts of the outbreak, and the contributions of climate events to an epidemic the […]

We’re reading about a new WHO leader with a vision of health care for all, and a very different vision in the White House budget proposal

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The World Health Assembly election this week of Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus to be the next Director General of the World Health Organization followed the release of the Trump administration’s budget proposal by one day. That led to overlapping discussions of two starkly irreconcilable views of the role that access to health care plays in a […]

As an Ebola outbreak raises unmet challenges, we’re reading how politics drives public health

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While the World Health Organization’s announcement of an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo raised appropriate alarm, the recognition of and response to the disease following nine cases of illness with three deaths over the last several weeks represent some degree of progress. The outbreak is the eighth in the country that was […]