Tag Archives: NIH

Fauci: A “global health reserve fund” needed, for Zika, and outbreaks to come

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//UPDATE — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, citing additional locally transmitted Zika infections, and failures in mosquito control efforts, issued a alert today advising pregnant women to avoid a 1-mile radius surrounding the Miami neighborhood where local transmission has taken place, in addition to other precautions.// The National Institutes of Health is set to start […]

NIH names new Office of AIDS Research director

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Post has been open since June 2015 departure of longtime leader Dr. Jack Whitescarver “We still need a vaccine and we need a cure. So we need ways to protect people not infected, and we need to try to find ways that we can cure people who are . . .” Dr. Maureen Goodenow, in […]

Dengue vaccine candidate protects fully in controlled human challenge trial

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Findings, process can further vaccine quests, researchers say An experimental vaccine against dengue completely protected the 21 volunteers  who received it and were subsequently exposed to the virus, while the 20 volunteers who received a placebo instead developed infection after exposure, a study published today in Science Translational Medicine found. Researchers who conducted the human challenge trial say the results bode well […]

AIDS 2014: The Lancet launches special issue on HIV and sex work

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Science Speaks is live-blogging from AIDS 2014 in Melbourne, Australia through the week, with updates on research, policy and insights from the 20th International AIDS Conference. MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA –  A remarkable and unprecedented collaboration between scientists and community leaders, the special issue of The Lancet on HIV and sex workers was launched at a symposium […]

AIDS vaccine update: With Thai trial, broadly neutralizing antibodies, new technologies and monkeys that met the SIV challenge, “we’re closer than ever”

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NIH AIDS Vaccine Research Program Director: “The future of HIV-1 Vaccines is bright.” In 1997, scientists announced the birth of Dolly the cloned sheep, a computer named Deep Blue beat reigning chess champion Gary Kasparov, and the Hubble telescope brought the far reaches of outer space closer. President Bill Clinton pointed to all of these […]

Fauci: HIV imaging yields “significant advance” in vaccine inquiry

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For 15 years scientists have worked to get a clear enough picture of how the protein surrounding the virus that leads to AIDS interacts with antibodies, to guide the development of a vaccine that would instigate an effective immune response. For years, the delicate and complicated structure of that protein has made that difficult, and […]

Global Health Appropriations: New Republicans on House State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee bring mixed history on PEPFAR

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The House Appropriations Committee’s State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee, with oversight on funding issues involving USAID  and the State Department, has six new members — three Republicans and three Democrats — bringing a mix of experience and stances on global health issues, including on policy, funding, and research. Today Science Speaks looks at the new […]

Lamar Alexander moves up to ranking Republican on Senate HELP Committee, as three new Democrats takes seats

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The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions deals with issues surrounding most of the agencies, institutes, and programs of the Department of Health and Human Services, including the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health. Pivotal in policies guiding medical research, preventive […]

Guns — or medicine? A doctor’s call, survey responses, and more in a presidential campaign edition of what we’re reading

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A doctor’s call for healthy foreign policy debate: John May, a South Florida corrections physician and founder of Health through Walls, a nonprofit that brings medical system support to prisons in developing countries, wrote this op-ed piece for the local newspaper in the county where the candidates were scheduled to hold their final debate on […]

Study yields clues on HIV strains with “evolutionary advantage” that can guide vaccine development

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While the virus that leads to AIDS has long been recognized to be “sloppy” in its replication, changing over time into divergent strains,  a National Institutes of Health-funded study recently found the virus that a person transmits tends to continue to look like the virus that originally infected that person. The study, significant for the […]