Monthly Archives: May 2011

Anthony Fauci reflects on 30 years of AIDS

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Anthony S. Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, is arguably the U.S. government’s best-known scientist. John Donnelly interviewed Dr. Fauci for Science Speaks’ series on the 30th anniversary since the discovery of a virus that would turn out to be HIV, and he talked about everything from how he first learned of the disease, to his surprise in President George W. Bush’s commitment, to the unmet needs today to fight the pandemic. Read more…

Know your epidemiology: one lesson of many for GeneXpert roll-out

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In this guest blog post, Sophie Beauvais of the Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard University, and Chris Gilpin from the WHO’s Stop TB Department, summarize the ongoing virtual panel discussion on the feasibility of implementing the Xpert MTB/RIF in limited-resource settings. Discussion so far is highlighting the critical importance of understanding the local epidemiology for tuberculosis (TB), especially for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and also for HIV-associated TB. Prioritizing these two risk groups in diagnostic algorithms that use the Xpert MTB/ RIF as the initial diagnostic test is a key message for the efficient integration of this new tool into existing health systems. But it is by no means the only key message. Read More…

Simpler treatment option for latent TB, tinkering with tenofovir to lower drug costs, and more…

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The following is a compilation of recent articles and news pieces making headlines in HIV/TB and global health. Research offers simpler, effective treatment option for latent TB infection: New research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that a supervised, three-month regimen of rifampentine and isoniazid for the treatment of latent tuberculosis […]

Waiting for GHI – Obama’s global health program likely to fall short of funding mark

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President Obama announced his Global Health Initiative (GHI), a $63 billion program to be spread over six years, in 2009. But the ambitious program aiming to promote health worldwide is likely to fall shy of its funding target.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen in the next three years, but I think even an optimistic budget scenario would not bring funding to $63 billion,” said Vice President and Director of Global Health and HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, Jennifer Kates. In fact, even if funding levels were to remain constant going forward, which some think is an optimistic future budget scenario, Kates said, the total allocation will still fall short by about $11 billion… Read More

Study: Early HIV treatment prevents new infections, preserves health

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Study results announced this morning unequivocally link early antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected persons with a 96.3% less chance of transmitting the virus to an uninfected partner, as well as a decreased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB), the number one killer of people living with HIV/AIDS. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) […]

Uganda poised to reconsider anti-gay bill

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The government of Uganda is re-opening discussion around the Anti-Homosexuality Bill that triggered an international outcry among civil rights groups, physicians and public health experts, and the U.S. Congress in early 2010. The legislation, originally proposed to the Ugandan Parliament by David Bahati in September of 2009, would impose life imprisonment or the death sentence […]

VIDEO: Advancing global health through new technologies – a Kenyan perspective

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The following Q & A with Kenyan Ob/Gyn Dr. Elizabeth Anne Bukusi, chief research officer and deputy director of research and training at the Kenya Medical Research Institute, covers topics from microbicide trials and challenges to roll-out and medical male circumcision to condom stock-outs and PEPFAR funding. Dr. Bukusi travelled to the U.S. to speak at an event this week discussing how the U.S. can advance global health through new technologies, hosted by the Global health Technologies Coalition Tuesday on Capitol Hill. Read more…

PEPFAR annual meeting updates, 4-drug 1-pill TB treatment, and more…

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In this edition of What We’re Reading, Science Speaks highlights the following articles and news pieces: Community-based Voluntary Counseling and Testing Ups HIV Testing Rates; Effectiveness of Four-Drug TB Treatment Confirmed; TB Discovery Paves the Way for Drugs that Prevent Lung Destruction, Antiretroviral Therapy and the Control of HIV Associated TB – Will ART Do It?; and Updates from the PEPFAR Annual Meeting in South Africa.

Private TB drug market might be fueling drug resistance, treatment failures

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The surprisingly large and irregular practices of the private tuberculosis (TB) drug market could be driving treatment failures and the emergence of multi-drug resistance (MDR), according to a new report in the journal PLoS ONE.  The study found the private TB drug market is now just as big as the public market, whereas previously TB […]

Global AIDS docs meet Sen. Brown, laud impact of U.S. investment in global health

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HIV medical experts Dan Kuritzkes, MD, Joia Mukherjee, MD, MPH, and Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH, highlighted the impact and ongoing importance of U.S. investment in global health and encouraged Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA) to work to ensure that global health programs remain a U.S. priority in a meeting on Monday in the senator’s Boston office.  […]