Monthly Archives: August 2011

TB vaccine candidate hits proof of concept trials among HIV positives, pregnancy doubles HIV transmission risk, and more…

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The following “What We’re Reading” selection is a compilation of recent articles and reports making headlines in HIV and TB news. Aeras TB vaccine trial among HIV positives hits Phase IIb: On Thursday Aeras and the Oxford-Emergent Tuberculosis Consortium announced the launch of a proof-of-concept Phase IIb study utilizing the MVA85A investigational tuberculosis (TB) vaccine […]

Evidence mounts against use of antibody-based blood tests to detect active TB

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Two articles that went live on the PLoS Medicine journal website Tuesday afternoon further explain the reasoning behind the World Health Organization’s (WHO) July 20th statement urging countries to ban blood tests for active tuberculosis (TB) and instead rely on accurate microbiological or molecular tests, as they recommend. Originally thought to be a small problem confined to few countries, further research has found that the inaccurate and unapproved blood tests for active TB are much more widely used, making the potential risk of false negatives and false positives much higher than anticipated. Moreover, the tests are not cost-effective as compared to other available TB tests…

Cepheid fares well with sales of rapid TB test in developing countries

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Producer of the rapid TB diagnostic GeneXpert, Cepheid recently announced its 2011 second quarter profits in an earnings report and subsequent public conference call. Revenues for the quarter reached $67 million, an increase of 11 percent from the previous quarter and 35 percent from the second quarter of 2010. Cepheid is now projecting revenues of $265 to $270 million for all of 2011, $15 to $20 million above its previous projections…

How will global health programs fare post debt ceiling deal?

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President Obama signed a deal to raise the debt ceiling Tuesday, avoiding a U.S. government default on its loans for the first time in history by just a few hours, by agreeing to cut the federal budget by nearly $2.5 trillion over the next decade. It is not likely global health programs will survive unscathed, but how large could the cuts be? Last week Science Speaks reported on the fiscal year (FY) 2012 foreign operations spending bill proposed in the House, which aims to cut global health funding by $700 million and blocks support for clean needle programs, cutting overall foreign aid by $3.5 billion. But with the new debt deal, is the foreign ops bill a moot point?

Call for proposals: Creative & novel ideas in HIV research

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Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research (CNIHR), in collaboration with the International AIDS Society (IAS), The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NIH-funded Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR), has announced a research grant program for early career investigators with no prior experience in HIV research. The program is sponsored by the National Centers for […]

World Congress addresses global health program integration

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While the Society for International Development 2011 World Congress focused on the general topic of development, a breakout session Friday on vertical and integrated approaches to global health, with panelists including Robert Clay and Ann Gavaghan, addressed the question of how best to achieve sustainable results, citing specific examples from the field.

Shedding light on the Department of Defense’s little-known contributions to global health

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The U.S. Department of Defense might not incite thoughts of contributions to global health, but a briefing Thursday on Capitol Hill shed new light on that thinking.

“The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is one of the largest developers of vaccines in the non-private sector,” said Peter Hotez, MD, PhD…