Monthly Archives: October 2011

New amfAR report estimates debt deal’s potential human toll

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Thousands of lives and years of gains made against HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria could be lost if proportional reductions are made to achieve the $1.2 trillion in spending reductions required by the Budget Control Act of 2011. That’s according to a new report issued Monday by The Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR), which estimates the human impact of the approximate $5.04 billion that will be cut from global health spending over nine years under a sequestration scenario…

“They go to die”: A quest to tell the story of HIV/TB among southern Africa’s gold miners

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The following is an interview with Jonathan Smith, writer and director of a documentary-in-progress entitled “They Go to Die,” highlighting the brutal toll of the dual HIV/TB epidemics among South Africa’s mine workers. Science Speaks sat down with Smith to discuss the film, what the epidemics look like on the ground in southern Africa, and what he is doing to raise the money needed to complete his documentary.

Senator Murray asks orgs to voice support for foreign affairs budget

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Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), co-chair of the Joint Deficit Reduction Committee, has called on organizations to submit letters in support of the International Affairs budget.  Murray, a strong advocate for global health spending and foreign assistance generally, hopes to utilize the organizational letters to show her colleagues the broad support for U.S. humanitarian investments abroad.  […]

Health groups speak out against possible cuts to military HIV research

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Speaking out against a potential $16 million cut for military HIV research proposed in the Senate version of the Department of Defense Appropriations bill for fiscal year (FY) 2012, leaders of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) sent a letter Thursday to the Secretary of the U.S. Army, John McHugh, making the case for sustaining the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP).

WHO reports decline in global TB rates, warns progress is at risk

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The number of people getting sick from tuberculosis (TB) each year is dropping, and the number of people dying from the disease fell to its lowest level in a decade. World Health Organization (WHO) representatives made the announcement Tuesday morning at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, along with the launch of the WHO 2011 […]

Hormonal contraception and HIV: Weighing the evidence and balancing the risks

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The following is a guest post by Jodi Jacobson, editor-in-chief of the blog RH Reality Check, where this post was originally published on October 5.

An article in Tuesday’s New York Times by Pam Belluck suggesting that injectable contraceptive use might double the risk of HIV transmission among women and their partners sent a wave of anxiety through the global public health community…

PEPFAR is poised to get on track to end AIDS

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For every 1,000 patient-years of PEPFAR-supported HIV treatment provided, 228 fewer HIV patients die, 449 fewer children become orphans, 61 fewer sexual HIV transmissions occur and 26 fewer “vertical” transmissions (e.g. mother-to-child) occur. The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Scientific Advisory Board heard the new PEPFAR ART Cost Model data from John Blanford, PhD, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Washington, DC, on September 14…

Treatment refusal in South Africa, what’s lacking in HIV vaccine research, and more…

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The following “What We’re Reading” selection is a compilation of recent articles and reports making headlines in HIV and TB news. One in Five Refusing ART in Soweto, Even When in Need: “One in five newly diagnosed [antiretroviral therapy (ART)] eligible adults attending the Zazi Testing Center, Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU) in Soweto, South […]