Category Archives: HIV/AIDS

Engaging the private sector to spur global development and save the foreign assistance budget

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Foreign assistance experts gathered Wednesday to discuss the George W. Bush administration’s legacy on global development, focusing on lessons learned and applying them to the next decade and beyond, at an event hosted by the Consensus for Development Reform and the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network in Washington. The panel discussion revolved around a central theme […]

Global health community applauds nomination of Dr. Jim Kim for World Bank president

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Much to the delight of global and domestic HIV/AIDs and tuberculosis (TB) advocates, President Obama announced Friday his nomination of Jim Yong Kim, MD, PhD, for the post of president of the World Bank. Kim has served Dartmouth College president since 2009. “Jim has spent more than two decades working to improve conditions in developing […]

Breaking: White House taps Dr. Grant Colfax to lead Office of National AIDS Policy

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The White House appointed Grant Colfax, MD, to lead the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP) Wednesday, according to a press release. Colfax is the director of the HIV Prevention and Research Section in the San Francisco Department of Public Health AIDS Office, where he has been instrumental in rolling out their “test and treat” […]

Household-based HIV and TB intervention boosts HIV testing, lowers community TB prevalence

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At the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle, Dr. Helen Ayles presented some key results on behalf of the ZAMSTAR team from the first randomized trial of a combined HIV and TB intervention strategy to demonstrate a reduction in population prevalence of tuberculosis. The study, conducted in 24 communities in Zambia and […]

High dose of new HIV drug might improve outcomes for HIV/TB co-infected

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Treating patients co-infected with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) can be tricky – as rifampin, a key sterilizing drug in TB regimens – can reduce concentrations of antiretrovirals administered at the same time, as well as other drug-drug complications. Early efforts to combat this phenomenon have unearthed a potential treatment candidate – an increased dose of […]

Study finds decreased HIV risk at the population level from increased HIV treatment in the community

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A study presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle Thursday demonstrated the first empirical evidence of a population-level reduction in risk of acquiring HIV infection in communities with antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage of all HIV-infected people (greater than 20 percent). Dr. Frank Tanser of the Africa Center for Health […]

New tool tracks AIDS and the global burden of disease

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At a plenary session Thursday at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Christopher Murray, MD, PhD, presented preliminary data from the 2010 revision of the Global Burden of Disease.  This effort, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is aimed at analyzing global health trends to quantify the comparative magnitude of health […]

New approaches needed to improve HIV testing and subsequent linkage to care

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Investigators at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections Wednesday reviewed studies looking to improve linkage to care rates after HIV diagnosis in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Gabriel Chamie of the University of California at San Francisco discussed outcomes in a routine linkage-to-care strategy versus and an enhanced strategy for accelerated antiretroviral therapy (ART) start […]

A case for viral load monitoring in resource poor settings

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Dr. Michael Saag presented data on behalf of the Center for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ) about a randomized trial of routine versus discretionary viral load monitoring among adults starting antiretroviral (ART) in Zambia Wednesday at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. In mid-2004 when ART was rolled out, the decision was […]

HIV program growth in Africa is not affecting patient retention rates

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The following is a guest blog post by HIV Medicine Association Executive Director Andrea Weddle, who is live-blogging from the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle. Patient retention in HIV programs has remained stable in a number of resource-limited countries despite rapid patient caseload and program growth since 2003. According to […]