Monthly Archives: April 2015

From an Ebola response to a PrEP trial, we’re reading why infectious disease responses and health system strengthening go together

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Women in PrEP trial feared they would have to leave study if they reported low adherence – This is a story we’ve heard before — several times now: Women are enrolled in a study to determine the effectiveness of a biomedical method to protect themselves from HIV infection. Earlier studies have indicated the method holds […]

Report from Tanzania: Attention to realities on the ground, criminalized populations, civil society needed to sustain HIV, TB responses

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Redeployment: Opportunities to Control HIV and TB in Tanzania, Observations from Dar es Salaam, Mbeya, and Zanzibar looks at successes, challenges, gaps in public health responses, and at how to deliver “the right things to the right places at the right time.” When we set off for Tanzania last fall, we stayed in touch with […]

New initiative puts research funding for Africa into hands of Africans

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For decades, the research agenda in Africa has been set by funders from Western Europe and the United States, but a new initiative puts control of managing Africa-focused research programs into the hands of Africans. The Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA) aims to be the African hub for peer-reviewing and managing […]

Self-testing for HIV in low-income, high-incidence countries could save money, could improve outcomes . . . but it’s complicated, analysis finds

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Introducing self-testing in a country like Zimbabwe, where HIV incidence is high, resources to confront HIV are limited, and only about half the people who live with HIV know they have the virus, could save about $75 million over the next 20 years, with some health benefits, besides. That would make the self-testing more cost-effective […]

Ebola lessons reiterate need to recognize global health realities

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An article in a recent issue of the American Society for Laboratory Medicine Lab Culture Newsletter begins by placing the reader in a health facility “holding center” where residents of a city experiencing an Ebola outbreak, in Sierra Leone, in Guinea, or in Liberia, would be referred upon the onset of symptoms. In harrowing terms […]

Sen. Cardin brings record of global health involvement as he takes lead Democrat seat on Senate Foreign Relations Committee

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The Senator replacing Bob Menendez as ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee takes on the role with a record spanning nearly three decades in Congress of stances supporting policies to improve health, human rights and science-based global and domestic responses. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD) has served on the committee since coming to the […]

Lessons from Ebola: A vaccine fast track too slow demonstrates need to prepare for pandemic potential diseases

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The following is a guest post by Elizabeth Bukowski, who covered the 3rd International One Health Congress in Amsterdam for Science Speaks. The conference, from March 18-21, focused on how science can help prevent emerging infectious diseases, 75 percent of which are estimated to originate in animals. The One Health concept recognizes that human, animal […]

Texas legislator waxes nostalgic for failure, Nigeria gets another chance, questions on condoms confound policymakers . . . We’re reading about the slippery slope of progress

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It’s April Fools Day and we’re catching up on reading that makes us do double takes. Is the Texas legislator who suggested moving HIV prevention funding to abstinence programs really a physician? (Apparently yes). Could Nigeria’s presidential election outcome be good news for the nation’s lagging HIV response? (Depends — but during the campaign both […]