Monthly Archives: June 2015

U.S. House Appropriations Committee approves bill that flat lines global HIV, cuts family planning

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When Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL) went on a learning tour in Kenya and Malawi last year, she met a Kenyan woman named Estry who told her she began her family at age 22 with no knowledge of contraception. She and her husband had eight children, Wasserman-Schultz said, “more children than they could care for.” At […]

XDR-TB patient in U.S. highlights global reach of infectious disease

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While health officials seek fellow passengers, researchers seek a vaccine If an argument is needed against prioritizing United States medical research dollars simply on the basis of disease burden in the U.S., global health advocates in Washington, DC didn’t have to look any farther this week than the National Institutes of Health campus in Maryland. […]

Cambodian sex workers describe barriers to HIV prevention, rights advocates track a widening treatment divide, and researchers look at syringe sharing . . . We’re reading about access to health services as a human right

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The hidden world of Cambodian sex workers – Last week we were reading a study highlighting how an anti-sex trafficking law enacted in Cambodia to protect women was having the unintended and opposite effect of standing between women and vital health services. In this video, reported and produced by Steve Sapienza, you can hear about […]

Ebola in ancient Athens examination raises question: Is west Africa outbreak making history or repeating it?

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The swift and brutal onset of the disease: fever followed by vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding, and for most, death within two weeks, made the outbreak terrifying, and seemingly inescapable. Even worse, it quickly became a disease of caregivers, with the greatest toll among physicians and family members who tended to the stricken. When the outbreak came to […]

What comes after START? We’re reading about a projected cost of universal access and other barriers to treatment

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Treating HIV Patients Before They Get Sick – This New York Times editorial follows the newspaper’s reporting on findings from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment study, which found that treating people for HIV upon diagnosis averts illnesses without adding negative impacts. The findings, the editorial says, raise the question of: “whether global and national […]

U.S. House subcommittee members reaffirm commitment to global health — with some dissension on what that means

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As subcommittee approves bill maintaining FY 15 HIV, TB support, exceeding White House request, Democrats chafe at budget restrictions, family planning caps, “global gag rule” reinstatement House Appropriations Committee State and Foreign Operations subcommittee members from both sides of the aisle today reiterated their support for global health  and emphasized they had rejected cuts to […]

Spending bill draft: House to maintain global AIDS, TB funds

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The House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs is scheduled to approve a draft bill Wednesday that rejects the Obama administration’s proposed cuts to HIV and TB spending for fiscal year 2016. The bill contains $250 million above the President’s fiscal year 2016 request for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB […]

Children, people with HIV, pregnant women and others underserved by TB drug development present ethical imperative, opportunities for global disease approaches, authors say

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Populations with needs that can and do affect the impacts of tuberculosis treatments are among the most vulnerable to the disease, make up significant proportions of the total of people sick with the disease worldwide, but are also the most neglected in TB drug development efforts. An article in a recently released Journal of Infectious […]