Category Archives: HIV/AIDS

Harm reduction, screening and treatment would save money and lives in Eastern European, Central Asian countries where injecting drug use drives rising rates of HIV, HCV

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Increasing access to sterile needles and syringes and to opioid substitution therapy, as well as to HIV and hepatitis C screening services and effective treatment would lower new infection rates by double digit percentages, save money and lives, and contain the spread of the viruses in Eastern European and Central Asian countries where people who […]

CROI 2018: Women controlled HIV-protection gains ground with interim results from open-label trials of antiretroviral vaginal ring

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BOSTON – With high rates of uptake, high rates of use, and HIV infection rates less than half of what would otherwise have been anticipated, the continued development of vaginal rings loaded with antiretroviral drug as a means of protection from the virus gained a large measure of vindication in interim trial results released here […]

What we’re reading: An unimaginably bad budget plan, and its impacts . . .

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The Trump Budget’s Effect on HIV: Unimaginably Bad – Dr. Melanie Thompson is Chair of the HIV Medicine Association and principal investigator of AIDS research at the Consortium of Atlanta. As a physician specializing in HIV care she has seen the inequities that fuel the epidemic in Atlanta, Georgia, and the impacts. Here, she enumerates […]

Letter speaks to evidence against White House policies, cuts and science stances

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An open letter seeking signatures from scientists and clinicians worldwide highlights directives, directions, policies, and proposed funding cuts from the Trump administration with impacts on evidence-based efforts to control and reverse the HIV pandemic. The letter, circulated by Health GAP (Global Access Project), points to the administration’s reinstatement and expansion of the “Mexico City Policy,” […]

How to cut HIV incidence? Researchers do the math and find keeping patients in care is pivotal

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Retaining people with HIV in care and treatment for the virus, as well as successful efforts to re-engage patients who have been in care but no longer are would go the furthest toward cutting the numbers of new infections in the United States in half within the next decade, a modeling study reported in Open […]

Study finds more than half of patients worldwide don’t access HIV treatment until immune systems are severely compromised

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In spite of guidelines and goals, treatment access remains delayed and unequal Data from nearly a million patients starting treatment for HIV across the world over the last decade shows 55 percent of them accessed antiretroviral treatment only after their immune cell — or CD4 — counts had dropped below 200, leaving them extremely vulnerable […]

Infectious diseases doctor sounds an international alarm about HIV treatment resistance in the Philippines

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Visiting IDWeek in October, we met with Dr. Edsel Salvana, an infectious diseases physician from the Philippines who has learned to tell the complicated story of the impacts and implications of the HIV epidemic in his country quickly and clearly. Now, with the online release  of his August 2017 TED Talk, you can see for […]

Survey across seven African countries finds young women and teenage girls less than halfway to 2020 goals for HIV control

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Fewer than half of the adolescent girls and young women living with HIV who were tested for the virus as part of door-to-door surveys across communities in seven African countries were already aware of their infection, according to findings released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s far short of the 2020 […]

In Guatemala study, illnesses indicating AIDS were already present in about fourth of patients newly diagnosed with HIV

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At Guatemala’s largest HIV clinic, researchers took a retrospective study of current patient records. One in four patients, they found, had an illness indicating advanced progression of the virus at the time they were diagnosed, increasing their risks of other diseases and death, while increasing the costs of their care. With plans now turning to […]

Keeping the balance in how we prevent HIV: Evaluating structural interventions

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The following is a guest post by Jim Thomas, PhD In 1978, the world celebrated the end of smallpox. Through a coordinated multinational effort, a global vaccination program had reached the furthest corners of the earth and eliminated the ability of the virus to spread. The success was intoxicating. Lists of the next diseases to […]