Category Archives: Uncategorized

HIV treatment retention study indicates weight of distance barriers, opportunity costs, value of peer-based interventions

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A study exploring why people enrolled in antiretroviral treatment programs across three African countries are “lost to follow-up” reveals obstacles to reaching the third “90” of UNAIDS recipe for success against the global HIV pandemic, and points to answers that can lie within communities where rates of HIV are high. The study, Retention in Care and Patient-Reported […]

Ebola offers another lesson for WHO: It’s not over until it’s over

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At the press conference Thursday announcing the latest official end of Ebola in Liberia and with it the end of all known chains of virus transmission in West Africa, representatives of the World Health Organization did emphasize that, as the virus has turned out to be more persistent than previously realized, further transmissions and infections, […]

Global Health 2015: Top 10 stories in HIV, TB and more

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Ebola – Since surfacing in Guinea the day after Christmas 2013, the Ebola virus has killed at least 11,000 people, 500 of them front-line health workers, and, in the course of devastating communities and health systems, caused the deaths of many more. In that same period, an estimated 3 million people worldwide died of tuberculosis, […]

UNAIDS Report: 15.8 million on treatment; infections, deaths continue to drop from peak in early 2000s

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The number of people receiving life-saving HIV treatment has doubled every five years since the peak of the epidemic in 2000, according to a new UNAIDS report ahead of World AIDS Day on December 1. Doubling that number one more time will break the epidemic, said UNAIDS executive director Michel Sidibe in a release accompanying […]

Anita Datar, who worked to bring the world together in health, lost to attack in Mali

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“Without a strategic plan or a road map, many countries suffered from multiple, fragmented systems that could not share information.” Some people look at a map and see divisions. Anita Datar looked at maps and saw ways to pull the world together. The horrific tragedy of the great difference between those two perspectives came into stark […]

Frieden, Birx discuss the catastrophe, warning of Ebola in last year

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At this time last year, Ebola had been reported in West Africa for six months, and in Liberia and Sierra Leone the number of new cases was doubling every few weeks. In Nigeria, where a man sick with the virus had landed in the capital city three months earlier and sparked an outbreak culminating in 20 cases, the epidemic […]

WHO commemorates World Hepatitis Day in Egypt, where HCV infection rates are high, as are prices to critical medicines

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It is a disease estimated to afflict more than 150 million people worldwide, infecting from three to four million more each year, and killing about 700,000. In Egypt, the World Health Organization estimates that 10 percent of people between 15 and 59 years old live with the disease. That’s hepatitis C alone. The combined impact […]

Global health assistance, in growing competition with other development areas, continues to decline

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After rapid growth for over a decade, development assistance for global health has decreased over the past five years and will probably continue to drop, according to panelists this week at a CSIS event launching the report, “Financing Global Health 2014.” The report, produced by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University […]

Panel discusses HIV in terms of stigma, star power, sequestration and faith

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Leaders and celebrities bring perspectives on global pandemic to Senate subcommittee An audio technician hummed “Tiny Dancer” as he wired the front of room 124 at the Senate Dirksen Office building, visitors who formed a line stretching down the hall talked of getting a seat from which they could see “Elton,” and the press seating […]

Ebola lessons reiterate need to recognize global health realities

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An article in a recent issue of the American Society for Laboratory Medicine Lab Culture Newsletter begins by placing the reader in a health facility “holding center” where residents of a city experiencing an Ebola outbreak, in Sierra Leone, in Guinea, or in Liberia, would be referred upon the onset of symptoms. In harrowing terms […]