Category Archives: What we’re reading

What We’re Reading: In HIV and TB treatment, science supports human rights

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The science is clear, HIV criminalization is abusive, discriminatory and counterproductive – The  destructiveness of HIV-specific laws that fueled stigma and discouraged diagnosis by criminalizing people living with the virus for not disclosing their status, for spitting, and for other supposed means of exposure or transmission was always apparent. For some time now, this International […]

What We’re Reading: Catching up on World AIDS Day pieces by and about experts, we’re reading about the power of science, justice, and strategy

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PEPFAR, launched as an emergency response to AIDS, has built a bridge to the future – In the 15 years since a bi-partisan Congress launched the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the potential of what equitable access to medicine and other evidence-based prevention measures could accomplish has only become clearer. Dr. Myron S. Cohen, […]

What we’re reading: From political machinations, to vulnerability on the frontlines, the insecurity of global health security

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Global Health Security: Protecting the United States in an Interconnected World – The reasons to ensure that all countries have the skills, staff and tools they need to detect, prevent, respond to and contain outbreaks of infectious diseases can be counted by the numbers of people spared from preventable illness and death, and by the […]

What we’re reading: Do forbidden words, restrictive policies compromise leadership of infectious disease responses?

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Trumps State Department eyes ban on terms like “sexual health” – Whether this could or will actually happen, leaving programs for “sexual and reproductive health services,” as just “reproductive health services” remains unclear. This Politico report notes, however, that one of the current administration’s first moves in 2017  was to reinstate, expand, and rename the global gag rule, […]

What we’re reading: Before the 49th Union World Conference on Lung Health, we’re reading how fair pricing and policies can end TB

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With the 49th Union World Conference on Lung Health about to open in the Hague Wednesday, with a theme of “Declaring Our Rights: Social and Political Solutions,” befitting the city of justice, we’re reading how fair pricing and responsive policies can speed progress against an ancient disease. And stay tuned — Science Speaks will be […]

What we’re reading: How to make the most of science, save lives, stop the spread of diseases

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What you need to know about South Africa’s historic liver transplant from an HIV-positive donor – Five years after the HOPE Act in the U.S. opened the way for people living with HIV to be organ donors, and increased the chances that people living with the virus would receive life-saving transplants, physicians in South Africa […]

What we’re reading: Changes needed to stop Ebola, other threats of pan-epidemic potential

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Health-care worker infections add to Ebola challenge in Congo – The challenges arising when a new Ebola outbreak surfaces in an area where the virus hasn’t been seen before include the exposure of frontline health workers without experience in necessary detection and protection measures. The resulting infections among medical staff who are needed most and […]

What we’re reading: Tracking infections and opioids, treating TB, Kofi Annan and global health — following evidence to do the right thing

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Infectious disease monitoring: More care needed to control impacts of opioid crisis – Surveillance that spots rises in rates of diseases linked to injecting drug use, care that combines treatment for addiction and for infections, and a workforce trained and ready to respond to the opioid crisis across Kentucky and the nation are needed now, […]

What we’re reading: Latest DRC Ebola outbreak poses new challenges, highlights ongoing R & D, training and resource needs

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Sustained US preparedness needed for Ebola and other pan-epidemic threats – Dr. Daniel Lucey of Georgetown University’s O’Neil Institute is familiar both with the on-the-ground obstacles to preventing the spread of disease with pandemic potential, and the on-the-ground consequences of delayed or inadequate responses. Having completed two volunteer stints caring for patients during the 2013-2016 […]

Use of Xpert TB diagnostic tool linked to lower death rates from all causes among HIV patients entering care in Malawi study

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Study randomized clinics to use Xpert or fluorescence microscopy for patients newly diagnosed with HIV showing TB symptoms  Among patients newly diagnosed with HIV and showing signs of tuberculosis disease, death rates in the year that followed were 22 percent lower among those in rural clinics assigned to use the Xpert point-of-care TB diagnostic tool, […]