Category Archives: What we’re reading

What we’re reading: Why DRC Ebola crisis calls for a PHEIC, how to end an epidemic and more

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It’s time to declare a public health emergency on Ebola – This opinion piece highlights what the declaration of a PHEIC, or public health emergency of international concern, would do towards optimizing and accelerating efforts to control the outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo and enhancing preparedness in neighboring countries. Shifting the argument of […]

What we’re reading: With another WHO PHEIC-out on DRC Ebola outbreak, critics ask if not now, when?

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The emergency committee convened in the aftermath of findings that a family with several members sick with Ebola had traveled from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Uganda, where two died, found for the third time that the 11-month outbreak still does not meet its criteria for a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, even […]

What we’re reading: How to stop an epidemic

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From dead last in HIV suppression among high-income countries, to eliminating transmission  is going to take work – Dr. W. David Hardy saw his first HIV patients more than 30 years ago in Los Angeles, where some of the earliest studies improving understanding of the virus and the epidemic took place. More recently he has […]

What we’re reading: Ebola may not be a PHEIC, but it is of international concern

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News of a health worker’s death is the latest to tell us we all have stakes in the DRC Ebola outbreak – Whether officially designated or not, the largest outbreak of Ebola recorded in the country where the virus was identified is of international concern, Dr. Krutika Kuppalli writes here. Dr. Kuppalli, who served as […]

What we’re reading: It is past time to end the impacts of tuberculosis

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India should heed a teenager’s historic fight for lifesaving tuberculosis treatment – The grotesque story told here of how a bureaucratic technicality was allowed to stand between a teenage girl and the cure she needed for drug-resistant tuberculosis can be seen as a microcosm of larger scale failures to conquer an ancient disease by sharing […]

What we’re reading: Thoughts on the White House budget proposal against a plan to eliminate U.S. HIV incidence

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Since the president’s Feb. 5 State of the Union address pledge to end transmissions of HIV in the United States in the next 10 years, and the release of a strategy the next day outlining plans to target the hardest hit counties and states, the most critical immediate unanswered questions have concerned funding for the […]

It’s March 1, so we’re reading why every single day should be “Zero Discrimination Day”

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As  countdowns to ending the global impacts of HIV and TB continue, we’re reading about the effects of laws and attitudes that turn pathways to preventing, diagnosing and treating the diseases into obstacle courses. Today is Zero Discrimination Day. Women and stigma: Conversations of resilience in the war against TB – Stories of sickness and […]

What we’re reading: Unprecedented Ebola challenges call for unprecedented responses, good investments and more

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Ebola Spreads Amid Violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and U.S. Role Remains Limited – Spreading near national borders with control efforts impeded by ongoing violence, vandalism and distrust, the current Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo is the largest outbreak of the virus the country has seen, and the second largest […]

What we’re reading: Saying goodbye to gay sex bans, providing safe injection, following WHO guidelines, preventing HIV, treating TB

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In the midst of stalled funding and politicized policies, we’re reading about answers to infectious diseases that remain just out of reach . . . Inspired by India, Singaporeans seek to end gay sex ban – Anti-gay laws imposed across the British Empire remain one of the key barriers to controlling HIV as a global […]

What We’re Reading: In HIV and TB treatment, science supports human rights

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The science is clear, HIV criminalization is abusive, discriminatory and counterproductive – The  destructiveness of HIV-specific laws that fueled stigma and discouraged diagnosis by criminalizing people living with the virus for not disclosing their status, for spitting, and for other supposed means of exposure or transmission was always apparent. For some time now, this International […]