Category Archives: What we’re reading

What we’re reading: Thoughts on the White House budget proposal against a plan to eliminate U.S. HIV incidence

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Since the president’s Feb. 5 State of the Union address pledge to end transmissions of HIV in the United States in the next 10 years, and the release of a strategy the next day outlining plans to target the hardest hit counties and states, the most critical immediate unanswered questions have concerned funding for the […]

What We’re Reading: In HIV and TB treatment, science supports human rights

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The science is clear, HIV criminalization is abusive, discriminatory and counterproductive – The  destructiveness of HIV-specific laws that fueled stigma and discouraged diagnosis by criminalizing people living with the virus for not disclosing their status, for spitting, and for other supposed means of exposure or transmission was always apparent. For some time now, this International […]

What we’re reading: Do forbidden words, restrictive policies compromise leadership of infectious disease responses?

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Trumps State Department eyes ban on terms like “sexual health” – Whether this could or will actually happen, leaving programs for “sexual and reproductive health services,” as just “reproductive health services” remains unclear. This Politico report notes, however, that one of the current administration’s first moves in 2017  was to reinstate, expand, and rename the global gag rule, […]

What we’re reading: Testing lag highlights role of healthcare access in HIV prevention and more about knowing the right thing to do, but . . .

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Tests are lagging and the end of the epidemic is far away – How can it be that nearly four decades after what later became known as HIV was first recognized as a syndrome killing men who had sex with men, and more than a decade since U.S. public health officials recommended routine testing as […]

What we’re reading: An unimaginably bad budget plan, and its impacts . . .

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The Trump Budget’s Effect on HIV: Unimaginably Bad – Dr. Melanie Thompson is Chair of the HIV Medicine Association and principal investigator of AIDS research at the Consortium of Atlanta. As a physician specializing in HIV care she has seen the inequities that fuel the epidemic in Atlanta, Georgia, and the impacts. Here, she enumerates […]

What we’re reading: Treatment is prevention, TB is a priority, welcome words and more

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“This means that people who take ART daily as prescribed . . . and achieve and maintain an undetectable viral load have effectively no risk of sexually transmitting the virus to an HIV-negative partner . . .” With these words the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention effectively put on the record a truth […]

Who needs infectious disease docs? Everyone . . .

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Journal supplement delves into the rewards and challenges of chasing bugs no one wants to catch . . . Of all the specialties a young physician can enter, one that offers a career of saving lives and protecting communities, supporting social justice and alleviating suffering, while following questions and finding answers across health systems, neighborhoods […]

We’re reading lessons of PEPFAR, and from progress gained and abandoned

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PEPFAR: Oh what good you have done!  From South Africa’s first reported AIDS patient in 1982, to the years when the epidemic filled hospitals and graveyards, to the miraculous but selective deliverance of antiretroviral medicine, to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, to a White House budget proposal for 2018 that threatens to reverse […]

World AIDS Day: We’re reading about history, progress, gaps, and the costs of inequities

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The AIDS.gov Timeline of HIV/AIDS, first posted in 2011 and updated since, is  a good place to go for a look at the winding path of recognition and response to HIV. From the announcement of the “Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals” to the formation of the first community based response of the Gay Men’s […]

Locals inform the strategies to fight HIV in their communities, activists propel evidence-based policy, and sex workers cite a failure to communicate . . .

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We’re reading about listening to people who know what they’re talking about Impact of Community Activism – With flat funding and rising need, the importance of spending every dollar committed to HIV responses effectively, and on evidence-based action has never been more critical. Direct involvement of affected populations is essential to determining where that isn’t […]