Category Archives: What we’re reading

CDC looks at TB/HIV syndemic, Lancet looks at expectations for Jim Kim, studies look at lower HIV risks for gay fathers, importance of healthy vaginas, and more. . .

By on .

CDC’s Grand Rounds feature examines past, future of HIV/TB response: In a world where an estimated 160 people die of tuberculosis every hour, where 25 percent of HIV/AIDS-related deaths are caused by TB, and where 9 million people can be expected to develop the disease each year, while untreatable forms of infection have emerged, “much […]

PEPFAR releases report to Congress, an update on drug-resistant TB in India, and more…

By on .

The following “What We’re Reading” selection is a collection of articles, commentary and resources making headlines recently in global health news. PEPFAR releases 8th annual report to Congress: The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) program delivered its 8th annual report to Congress recently. The five-page document outlines the program’s progress as of […]

World TB Day roundup

By on .

This special edition of What We’re Reading highlights reports and commentary released around World TB Day (Saturday, March 24, 2012). No More Crying, No More Dying. Towards Zero TB Deaths in Children: This issue brief from the Stop TB Partnership and the World Health Organization calls on public health programs and health care providers to […]

What We’re Reading: World TB Day coverage

By on .

In a special edition of What We’re Reading, the following is a compilation of reports, news stories and statements released in honor of World TB Day, March 24, 2011. Content includes a response from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a report from Médecins Sans Frontières highlighting the fight against drug resistant tuberculosis and the need for new drugs, and a call to make TB vaccine development a priority in the Decade of Vaccines.

What We’re Reading

By on .

The December issue of Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (JAIDS) has a supplement on HIV/AIDS among drug using populations. Articles include analyses of the link between drug use and HIV epidemics and antiretroviral therapy treatment and prevention in drug users. There is also one article that looks at tuberculosis and hepatitis C co-infection with HIV/AIDS, examining how these deadly combinations affect drug users worldwide.

On the ONE blog, Julie Walz from the Center for Global Development writes about their annual “Commitment to Development Index,” which ranks countries on their commitment to aid and development. The United States is No. 11. Sweden is No. 1, and South Korea comes in last.

What We’re Reading

By on .

Dr. Sten H. Vermund – a member of the Center’s Scientific Advisory Board – released a new report in Current HIV/AIDS Reports this week on the significance, challenges and opportunities in combination HIV prevention strategies. He suggests that these “prevention packages” be scaled up and their effectiveness evaluated.

A Lancet article this week examines the Stop TB Partnership. The piece outlines challenges to tuberculosis control and proposes solutions.  It argues that treatment should be integrated into efforts to reduce poverty and treatment of other diseases that often co-exist with tuberculosis, and specific goals should be set to “inspire new partners to push for tuberculosis elimination.”

This week, the World Health Organization released its first report on neglected tropical diseases.  Erin Hohlfelder at the ONE blog has a good post on the significance of this publication, saying it is the end of “report neglect” on NTDs.

What We’re Reading

By on .

The One Blog this week posted a video (accompanies this post) from David Rochkind, an award-winning photographer working on a project to illustrate the impact of tuberculosis on the world. In the video, Mariana Bernofsky tells of her experiences as a pregnant woman with TB in Balti, Moldova. More of Rochkind’s work is available on his blog…

What We're Reading

By on .

This week from Science Speaks: The One Blog posted Friday on a woman in Zimbabwe who, while caring for family members with AIDS, found that soy milk can provide much needed nutrients to AIDS patients in a form they can easily digest.  Though her family has since passed away, she now supplies soy milk to […]