Category Archives: What we’re reading

An imperative for secrecy, a barrier to services, a driver of an epidemic . . . We’re reading about a public health hazard commonly called stigma

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‘The mercurial piece of the puzzle’: Understanding stigma and HIV/AIDS in South Africa – The role of stigma in challenges to HIV responses, including adequate funding, sound policies, access to services, the numbers of people diagnosed, the numbers of people for whom treatment is uninterrupted, and more, is difficult to assess because the word, used […]

Ending gender-based violence, doing more for adolescents: We’re reading about young people and HIV

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UNAIDS calls for an end to gender-based violence – In this press release issued ahead of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women yesterday, the Joint UN Program on HIV/AIDS says gender-based violence is not only a serious human rights violation but also increases the risk of HIV infection, particularly among young […]

New report on children and TB, Global Fund considers new approaches to ending AIDS, and UK activists call for Blueprint

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Out of the Dark – Meeting the needs of children with TB: Last week, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) presented findings from their latest report on children and TB at the Union World Conference on Lung Health in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  The study found that a whopping 93 percent of children tested for TB are misdiagnosed, […]

Study reveals effective preventive dose, pain drug for tuberculosis treatment, bad news and new steps in Uganda . . . and more

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New approaches to disease treatment and prevention, as well as failures in old approaches are part of what we’re reading this week . . .   NIH-Funded analysis estimates effective PrEP dosing for men who have sex with men: An analysis of data from the iPrEx study looked at the amount of the antiretroviral medicine […]

Lessons learned, lessons yet to be learned, Lancet’s MSM series, tuberculosis as kindling — HIV as the match, and more . . .

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JAIDS all-PEPFAR supplement is free online and gives a past, present, future look at the President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief as a historic effort that can still look forward to its greatest accomplishments. While the emphasis is on the program’s successes and a pre-AIDS 2012 panel discussion was light on the “lessons learned” from […]

CDC looks at TB/HIV syndemic, Lancet looks at expectations for Jim Kim, studies look at lower HIV risks for gay fathers, importance of healthy vaginas, and more. . .

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CDC’s Grand Rounds feature examines past, future of HIV/TB response: In a world where an estimated 160 people die of tuberculosis every hour, where 25 percent of HIV/AIDS-related deaths are caused by TB, and where 9 million people can be expected to develop the disease each year, while untreatable forms of infection have emerged, “much […]

Global health costs of drug war, how to bring the lab to the patient, a CHANGE-ing look at GHI, and more . . .

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The global health cost of the war on drugs: Laws targeting drug users that crowd prisons, serve as obstacle courses between drug users and HIV treatment, and push drug users into situations at high risk for HIV exposure — these are just part of How the Criminalization of Drug Use Fuels the Global Pandemic, this […]

Bipartisan foreign aid, and Obama’s Global Health Initiative

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The following is a collection of recent articles and news pieces making headlines in HIV/TB and global health:

A call for more effective foreign assistance: An opinion piece in The Daily Caller calls for more effective foreign assistance programs and bipartisan efforts to strengthen U.S. global leadership. Mark Green, Jim Kolbe, and Rob Mosbacher argue that the new Congress should make a bipartisan effort to improve foreign aid – just 1% of the federal budget – rather than slash budgets.

What We’re Reading

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The December issue of Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (JAIDS) has a supplement on HIV/AIDS among drug using populations. Articles include analyses of the link between drug use and HIV epidemics and antiretroviral therapy treatment and prevention in drug users. There is also one article that looks at tuberculosis and hepatitis C co-infection with HIV/AIDS, examining how these deadly combinations affect drug users worldwide.

On the ONE blog, Julie Walz from the Center for Global Development writes about their annual “Commitment to Development Index,” which ranks countries on their commitment to aid and development. The United States is No. 11. Sweden is No. 1, and South Korea comes in last.

What We’re Reading

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Dr. Sten H. Vermund – a member of the Center’s Scientific Advisory Board – released a new report in Current HIV/AIDS Reports this week on the significance, challenges and opportunities in combination HIV prevention strategies. He suggests that these “prevention packages” be scaled up and their effectiveness evaluated.

A Lancet article this week examines the Stop TB Partnership. The piece outlines challenges to tuberculosis control and proposes solutions.  It argues that treatment should be integrated into efforts to reduce poverty and treatment of other diseases that often co-exist with tuberculosis, and specific goals should be set to “inspire new partners to push for tuberculosis elimination.”

This week, the World Health Organization released its first report on neglected tropical diseases.  Erin Hohlfelder at the ONE blog has a good post on the significance of this publication, saying it is the end of “report neglect” on NTDs.