Tag Archives: HPTN 052

As the HIV epidemic explodes in the Philippines, a doctor’s call for artillery

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Standing next to his ID Week poster presentations –one on HIV opportunistic infections, one on flu monitoring — at the San Diego Conference Center last week, Dr. Edsel Maurice T. Salvaña cheerfully explained how he recently got chosen to be one of the Jaycee’s Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World. “I have a big […]

ID Week: Making the most of money and science

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SAN DIEGO, CA — Three decades into the AIDS epidemic, quests to identify the most effective responses — in spending, in treatment, and in prevention — continue, but informed by history and advancing science, are coming closer to their target, according to three panelists, in a continuation of ID Week explorations of the shifting HIV […]

ID Week: Treatment is Essential to Bending the Curve of the Epidemic but Challenges Remain

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SAN DIEGO, CA — Dr. Wafaa El Sadr of Columbia University offered an ID Week presentation Thursday about the impact of treatment on the global epidemic and the new promise of changing the trajectory of the epidemic by scaling up treatment both to save lives and reduce HIV incidence.  She reminded her audience that treatment […]

Blueprint: Dr. Myron Cohen on treatment as prevention and other essential elements of a global AIDS plan

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Dr. Myron S. Cohen is the architect and principal investigator of the multinational HPTN 052 trial, which demonstrated that antiretroviral treatment prevents the sexual transmission of HIV-1. This work was recognized by Science Magazine as the “Breakthrough of the Year” in 2011. His research focuses on the transmission and prevention of transmission of HIV, and […]

Why response to drug-resistant tuberculosis lags, deadly disease in Togo prisons, while science leaps money lags . . .

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Tuberculosis, Drug Resistance, and the History of Modern Medicine: From what may have been the first published randomized clinical drug trial, to  neglect when deaths declined in the affluent countries where “headlines are written,” to the widening fault lines that divided those who had to worry about tuberculosis, and those who could ignore it, to […]