Author Archives: Antigone Barton

Science supporters take calls for evidence, investment, progress to streets around the world

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From the rain-soaked National Mall in Washington D.C., to cities across the United States and around the world, on the streets of Cape Town, Kampala, Lagos, Accra, Madrid, London, Geneva, Seoul, Mexico City, Munich, Rio and Rome, and cities across Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Japan, marchers in about 600 events globally stood up for […]

Project’s goal: End malaria for all

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The following is a guest post by Brittany Iskarpatyoti, MPH On World Malaria Day 2015, MEASURE Evaluation called for a global commitment from public health workers to address gender in anti-malaria programming and policies and build up data systems to measure and respond to gender inequities in malaria outcomes. Two years later, gender’s role in malaria programs […]

Community-based and comprehensive, response to HIV among people injecting drugs in Athens reversed climb in new cases

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Before 2011, when HIV infections among people who injected drugs in Athens, Greece rose suddenly and steeply, the epidemic of the virus in that country was classified as a low-level one; affecting less than 1 percent of the general population, and less than 5 percent of any of the populations at greatest risk. In the […]

Mark Wainberg, 1945-2017

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The HIV community lost a leader and a champion with the death of Dr. Mark Wainberg Tuesday. The chair of the HIV Medicine Association, a producer of this blog, released a statement recognizing some of Dr. Wainberg’s contributions today, which we share here: The HIV community is deeply saddened to learn of the tragic loss […]

We’re reading about pandemic preparedness (or lack thereof) and why global health is local health

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Cutting collaborations will not put “America first” – This commentary in Nature by a Syrian pulmonologist whose 2001 Fogarty funded research advanced understanding of a health-impacting trend in his country and in the United States, highlights the cross border benefits of the Center’s international scientific collaborations more directly and succinctly than anything I’ve read so far. […]

CUGH 2017: Global Health Security Agenda confronts the inevitable and the unknowns in disease threats, responses

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Consider four disaster scenarios acknowledged to have the potential for catastrophic impacts on humanity — an asteroid hit . . . continued unchecked global warming  . . . a nuclear holocaust . . . a global pandemic. Until recently, the most immediate of these received the least attention, former head of Management Sciences for Health […]

CUGH 2017: The lessons of global health come home in Fogarty fellow stories, questions, plans

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One fellow went to Chile to track a parasite that spreads disease from dogs to humans . . . Another investigated the social networks that could improve HIV outreach in India, another found links between pollution and heart disease that affect people worldwide, including in the United States . . . As Fogarty turns 50 […]

Yellow fever, polio reports highlight obstacles to disease prevention, control, eradication

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In areas of where staff, supply and training gaps join with population mobility and political instability to compromise surveillance efforts, control of diseases for which preventive vaccines exist remains elusive A little more than four months after the December 2015 start of an urban outbreak of yellow fever in Angola, the health ministry of the […]

CDC finds Zika-related defects in babies, fetuses of one in 10 women with confirmed Zika infection

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In findings from what officials call the largest systematic tracking of pregnancies among women with laboratory evidence and confirmation of Zika virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data Tuesday showing that one in 10 women with confirmed infection while pregnant had babies or fetuses with birth defects that have been linked to the […]

Original backers of 2004 “Bioshield” legislation say lapse leaves gap in pandemic, biological attack preparedness

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A few weeks after the attacks of September 11, 2001 took the lives of nearly 3,000 people in New York, Washington, DC and a field in rural Pennsylvania, a photo editor named Bobby Stevens at a South Florida-based supermarket tabloid newspaper was hospitalized with a mysterious illness. It was unfamiliar to local physicians who had little reason […]