What we’re reading: Saying goodbye to gay sex bans, providing safe injection, following WHO guidelines, preventing HIV, treating TB

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In the midst of stalled funding and politicized policies, we’re reading about answers to infectious diseases that remain just out of reach . . .

Inspired by India, Singaporeans seek to end gay sex ban – Anti-gay laws imposed across the British Empire remain one of the key barriers to controlling HIV as a global health threat. This look at how Singapore activists were inspired by India’s Supreme Court ruling to end its law offers an interesting look at the challenges to eliminating a stubborn vestige of colonial oppression.

The world needs a urine test for TB. But it’s already here – Mixed signals from the World Health Organization are limiting use of a low-cost and critical tool to diagnose tuberculosis among people with HIV, among whom the disease remains the leading cause of death, this article notes.

Welcome to the Church of Safe Injection – From a first commandment of harm reduction, to the miracle offered by naloxone, the founder of this church has faith in evidence-based interventions.

As WHO issues new TB treatment guidelines, MSF calls for urgent scale-up of all-oral treatment – The World Health Organization’s recommendation for a more effective, less toxic regimen for treating drug-resistant tuberculosis could more than double the number of people to receive the newest anti-TB drugs, Médecins Sans Frontières notes. Now it’s up to countries to update their policies, and provide the necessary resources.

Fetal Tissue is “Gold Standard” for Key Studies, NIH Workshop Concludes – While an administration-mandated review of fetal tissue research threatens to put scores of biomedical studies on hold, a workshop concludes that fetal tissue has played an indispensable role in finding treatments for deadly diseases.

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